Jason Hope sees aviation technology driving all of our futures

Jason Hope is one of the foremost entrepreneurs in the state of Arizona. Famous for founding Jawa, one of the first premium content streaming services, Hope has had a stellar career, bringing many ideas to fruition and building business after business in successful and productive ways.Recently, Hope has taken to the internet, getting the word out about the future technologies that will make up the Internet of Things. Hope is extremely excited about the myriad possibilities that this new technology will unlock. He views the Internet of Things as one of the greatest opportunities for entrepreneurs and technological innovators that has happened over the last 100 years. In fact, Hope believes that the Internet of Things may ultimately prove to be as transformative as the Industrial Revolution itself.

One of the ways in which Hope says that the Internet of Things is already here is in the field of aviation. Hope notes that aviation has long been one of the prime motivators for innovation in the technological sector, especially in the United States. Many of the most innovative and life-changing inventions have come directly from the aviation industry.Hope points to the development of sophisticated auto landing systems in the 1960s as one of the crucial precursors to modern personal computing. Hope says that the first successful fully automated auto landing systems were installed in Boeing 727 in the early ‘60s. At the time, developing the computing power necessary to make such a system work was an incredible achievement. What’s even more incredible is that, by the mid-’60s, hope says that many Boeing aircraft were capable of fully landing themselves without any pilot intervention.

Hope says the systems were heavily reliant on radio beacon technology, a technology that today is becoming a crucial aspect of the Internet of Things. Boyne spent millions and millions of dollars on researching and developing computers, hardware and software applications for their auto land systems. This resulted in substantial progress in the miniaturization of computing technology, leading directly to the advent of the personal computer in the late ‘70s and early ‘80s.